Warbird Information Exchange

DISCLAIMER: The views expressed on this site are the responsibility of the poster and do not reflect the views of the management.
It is currently Mon Dec 17, 2018 3:20 am

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Classic Wings Magazine WWII Naval Aviation Research Pacific Warbird Digest
When Hollywood Ruled The Skies - Volumes 1 through 4 by Bruce Oriss


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Sun Aug 15, 2010 3:08 am 
Offline
Group Captain
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 4:42 pm
Posts: 441
Hi all

I found out this some time ago, did a search on the forum for "recognition models" without big success so I thought I could share it.

There is a community of people outhere doing woden recognition models, mostly still following the guidelines issued by the goverment during WWII. There was an effort at the time to put schools doing this kind of stuff to use for aircraft recognition. Their main HQ is this website:

http://smm.solidmodelmemories.net

There is a flickr group also with terrific pictures:

http://www.flickr.com/groups/smm/pool/with/2732663132/

And for wetting the appetite I'll show you a Polikarpov I-16 Mosca by Oceaneer99 (flickr username)

Image

_________________
rreis

If you want pictures, see rreis@flickr


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 12:08 am 
Offline
Been here a long time
Been here a long time

Joined: Sun May 02, 2004 1:16 am
Posts: 10220
I've got maybe 100 kits I've collected over the years. I'll probably get building when I retire...


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:49 am 
Offline
Group Captain
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 4:42 pm
Posts: 441
Hi BDK. These doesn't come in kits. You got the plans, a piece of wood and saw-carve-sand away!

Image

_________________
rreis

If you want pictures, see rreis@flickr


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 8:18 am 
Offline
Account Suspended
User avatar

Joined: Wed Nov 14, 2007 3:06 pm
Posts: 2713
I have lots of these 'kits' as well. They consist of; plans, several pieces of wood.., that's it!

Guillow's made them.. I have not tackled one yet. The rendering of the complete kit looks amazing.., but I can not imagine the effort to get there. I can imagine there were thousands of frustrated kids back in the early 50's when these came out who were in the same state of 'WTF'.., and put them way up on their top shelf.., waiting until Epay was born!

_________________
S.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 8:23 am 
Offline
Group Captain
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 4:42 pm
Posts: 441
ah, it seems I should apologise? I was under the impression you just get the plans and found your own piece of wood so to speak, didn't knew actual "kits" were sold for these...

BDK, sorry for the confusion.

_________________
rreis

If you want pictures, see rreis@flickr


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 11:20 am 
Offline
Been here a long time
Been here a long time

Joined: Sun May 02, 2004 1:16 am
Posts: 10220
Most of my kits are WW2 vintage and they even call them "recognition models" in some cases. Some are just blocks of wood (pine) and some have the profiles sawed on to them, "all" you have to do is remove the corners by planing and sanding to match templates.

Some of these models look pretty accurate, some are way off, like a Zero with an elliptical wing.

No problem with the confusion. Lots to learn! Thanks for bringing this up. It really was the genesis of the modern model kit. Kits went from wood props to plastic prop discs to cast zinc props to plastic props. Then the plastic details came along followed by the entire model being made of plastic.

There were also lots of variations in kits too- solid blocks of wood, profiled pieces of wood, stacks of wood sheet glued together, stringer and tissue, etc. I also have tanks, Ducks, Jeeps, Seeps, Jimmies & searchlights.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 1:33 pm 
Offline
3000+ Post Club
3000+ Post Club
User avatar

Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 12:56 pm
Posts: 3442
Location: North of Texas, South of Kansas
I've visited with folks who put together the recognition models in grade school to support the war effort. The Convalescent Wards at some of the Army Air Fields also let the soldiers in the hospital work on them as therapy/time-killing projects while laid up.

I made a mold and resin-cast some repair parts for a damaged B-29 recognition model for a friend years ago. It was very basic, but that I-16 is really detailed!

An excellent thread, rreis!
Scott


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 2:48 pm 
Offline
Been here a long time
Been here a long time

Joined: Sun May 02, 2004 1:16 am
Posts: 10220
There were some factory produced recognition models made of hard rubber or some kind of plastic as well, were't there?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 3:25 pm 
Offline
Group Captain
User avatar

Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 4:42 pm
Posts: 441
bdk wrote:
There were some factory produced recognition models made of hard rubber or some kind of plastic as well, were't there?


I think you're right, full story here it seems: http://www.mikes-tanks.com/RecognitionModels.htm

Quote:
Recognition models, also referred to as ID models or spotters models, were used by the armed forces to train troops to identify ships, airplanes and ground vehicles. This aided in many areas, from preventing casualties from friendly fire, to better estimates of enemy troop strength. It was not unusual for spotter models to come in at least two scales. A small scale for students to use, and a large scale 'teachers model' to aid the instructor in describing the important aspects of a particular vehicle. Spotter models were made of many different materials, including lead/zinc alloys, plastic/cellulose acetate, and wood. In addition to recognition models, the government also issue recognition cards, pamphlets, and even used kites with airplane silhouettes to help train soldiers.

_________________
rreis

If you want pictures, see rreis@flickr


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 11:53 pm 
Offline
3000+ Post Club
3000+ Post Club
User avatar

Joined: Fri Apr 30, 2004 2:29 pm
Posts: 4021
Location: Dallas, TX
Back when I had time I used to LOVE building solids. They are harder to detail than plastic, but you really feel like you've built something when you get done. I think I have 15 or so old kits from the 40s or so from Comet, Cadet, Hobby Model, Randles, etc... It took more imagination and creativity to create a model out of them, but I'll bet the boys who built them were more satisfied when they finished them.

Ryan

_________________
Aerial Photographer with Red Wing Aerial Photography currently based at KRBD and tailwheel CFI.
Websites: The Doolittle Raid Remembered, ShortStudio.com and Lbirds.com.

The horse is prepared against the day of battle: but safety is of the LORD. - Prov. 21:31 - Train, Practice, Trust.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Aug 17, 2010 12:19 am 
Offline
3000+ Post Club
3000+ Post Club
User avatar

Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 12:56 pm
Posts: 3442
Location: North of Texas, South of Kansas
The B-29 I cast parts for was of the plastic/acetate variety.

S


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 19, 2010 3:22 am 
Offline
Long Time Member
Long Time Member
User avatar

Joined: Sun Oct 10, 2004 4:43 pm
Posts: 7501
Location: northern ohio
cripes they are even knocking off early ww 2 WOOD!! i.d. models?? i know well about the faux cellulose acetate junk. check out my article in the september / october 2009 issue of "warbirds international magazine" on the topic of silhouette i.d. models & memorabilia. the company, that is knocking off the cellulose repros has taken heat for even duplicating the dates on the models to ww 2. i've been told this practice was stopped by protest, & a buyer can now discern a repro from an original. i've yet to see a revised repro version.

_________________
tom d. friedman - hey!!! those fokkers were messerschmitts!! * without ammunition, the usaf would be just another flying club!!! * better to have piece of mind than piece of tail!!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2010 9:53 pm 
Offline
Group Captain

Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:09 pm
Posts: 387
Location: Knoxville
at his high school in Detroit, my dad made Boulton-Paul Defiant recognition models. Wish he'd kept a few of 'em...

_________________
Donate to support WIX here:

http://www.warbirdsresourcegroup.org/donate.html


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:48 pm 
Offline
Former Lurker

Joined: Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:40 pm
Posts: 4
The wartime Detroit school ID model program was especially interesting because they applied a manufacturing process to produce large quantities of wood models, rather than having children carving one plane at a time. The labor was spread out over many schools, each performing one step of production. Duplicating machines and jigs were designed to maintain accuracy. "Air Trails" magazine did an article about it.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 27, 2013 10:55 am 
Offline
Former Lurker

Joined: Tue Jun 18, 2013 12:40 pm
Posts: 4
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group