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PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2008 4:49 pm 
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I am looking into getting some parts made and per the original blue prints, the material is listed as "47A3 Alum.Alloy". What is the present day metal to use for this?


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2008 10:03 pm 
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Stearman75972 wrote:
I am looking into getting some parts made and per the original blue prints, the material is listed as "47A3 Alum.Alloy". What is the present day metal to use for this?

Is the part made from a bar stock, casting or forging?
Rich


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 12, 2008 10:17 pm 
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I should have stated it is sheet metal. It is being used to make a seat.


Stearman75972 wrote:
I am looking into getting some parts made and per the original blue prints, the material is listed as "47A3 Alum.Alloy". What is the present day metal to use for this?


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PostPosted: Thu Mar 13, 2008 5:26 pm 
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For what it is worth;
From a 1943 Aircraft Mechanics Handbook, The small black Sprial bound one.
Material Spec-47A3 Cond T = Alum Alloy #17 (2017), Heat Treat Spec SR-53, Age for 4 Days, Hardening Temp 930-950 F, Quench- Water, Tensile Strength- 55K psi, Yield- 30K psi, Brinell 90-105, Rockwell B60-B70, Bend Tubing 8 X D
This table is labeled NAF SK-1479.
Technically this could be 2017T-4 in modern standards. There is also a slightly different version labeled 2117-T3, IIRC. The 2017T-4 was a common alloy before 24ST or 2024T-3511 came along.
Rich


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 6:21 pm 
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Is it important to use the original material for historical purposes? If not, I made many race seats from 3003. It works easily and depending on the mounts, beading around the edges, rolled beads etc. should be plenty strong for this application. 8)

Do you have an old one to make patterns from? Also makes a difference if you intend to weld on the seat.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 17, 2008 9:49 pm 
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Can 3003 be heat treated?


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 5:00 am 
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No. Work hardening only.

Edit to add. I spent many years selling alumin(i)um and alloys although nearly all commercial rather than aerospace. A lot of what I knew I've forgotten...
No books to hand but I guess 3003 will only be about 1/3 of the strength of 2017. Not that I've ever heard of 2017 but all 2000 series alloys are very strong. It seems a bit over the top for a seat but that's probably one of the reasons I'm not an aeroplane designer. :)


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PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 5:19 am 
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I would go 2024-0 and heat treat it up to T3 or T6 strength afterwards.

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PostPosted: Tue Mar 18, 2008 7:37 pm 
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That would be as long as there is no welding required...right :?:

Unless I have forgotten (totally possible) I thought that 2024 contained too much copper to allow for successful weldability without cracking and ultimate failure. Yes, no?

Back in my day, young whippersnappers (great name for a strip club :shock: ) 2024 and 7075 were great choices for machined components. If welding was necessary 6061 and 3003 were the alloys of choice.

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