Warbird Information Exchange

DISCLAIMER: The views expressed on this site are the responsibility of the poster and do not reflect the views of the management.
It is currently Wed Apr 01, 2020 4:19 pm

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Classic Wings Magazine WWII Naval Aviation Research Pacific Luftwaffe Resource Center
When Hollywood Ruled The Skies - Volumes 1 through 4 by Bruce Oriss


Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2
Author Message
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 7:54 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2005 10:54 am
Posts: 920
Location: Madison, MS
A2C wrote:
Well, you may not need a bonding strap for lightning, but for static electricity you want continuity through the aircraft so it will go to ground.

I don't know if N.A. built T-6's had the bonding straps in the rudder. The Canadian built Harvards had extra bonding straps. including through the rudder, etc.


You sure are clueless when it comes to aircraft construction and systems, aren't you?
Without a static wick, there is noplace for the charge to dissapate to. Unless you have a bonding strap at each hinge, you are still going to have a charge try to transfer at each point of contact, ie, hinge bearing.

_________________
If God had wanted man to fly behind a flat motor, Pratt Whitney would've built one.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 19, 2009 2:40 pm 
Offline
BANNED/ACCOUNT SUSPENDED
User avatar

Joined: Mon Aug 11, 2008 1:58 am
Posts: 1054
Location: In Your Screen
Quote:
You sure are clueless when it comes to aircraft construction and systems, aren't you?
Without a static wick, there is noplace for the charge to dissapate to. Unless you have a bonding strap at each hinge, you are still going to have a charge try to transfer at each point of contact, ie, hinge bearing.


Well Hello! You sure sound friendly, and you certainly see the best in others! A bit salty are we?

The Canadian built Harvard has more bonding straps in it than the T-6. read the manual.

_________________
"No government ever voluntarily reduces itself in size. Government programs, once launched, never disappear. Actually, a government bureau is the nearest thing to eternal life we'll ever see on this earth!" R.R.

Welcome to the USSA! One Nanny State Under the Messiah, Indivisible with Tyranny, Higher Taxes, Socialism, Radical Environmentalism and a Loss of Income for all. Boy I'm proud to be a part of the USSA, what can I do to raise taxes, oh boy oh boy!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 8:26 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Feb 07, 2008 3:21 pm
Posts: 11
Location: Netherlands, Europe
skymstr02 wrote :
Quote:
Without a static wick, there is noplace for the charge to dissapate to


I was just wondering who is clueless here because this is not true.

The purpose of a static wick is to lower the level at which the discharges will happen , this will result in less radio "noise" and therefore improves the radiocommunications. There are a million fast high altitude planes out there without wicks who doesn't create a spark when they touch down.


skymstr02 wrote :
Quote:
Without static wicks, I'm not sure if there is any advantage of having bonding straps anyway


You are probably right if :

- you look at a static electricity point of view
- you don't use the airframe as negative ground for your taillight
- you don't have an orginal radio set from WW2.

The first bonding straps were introduced because normally all equipment ( incl startermotors ) used the airframe as negative ground. Using bolts and nuts only was not enough.

Later the first radio equipment were installed in aircraft. These first radios were very sensitive and the total electrical airframe capacity ( mass ) influenced it's tuning. So if an aileron intermittently "connected" to the airframe the radio would de-tune. This is when they started connecting all the metal parts with bonding straps.

Static electricity shouldn't be a problem for a Harvard / AT-6 in normal conditions but I can imagine that in the cold winters of Canada they found out that it was and to be sure added more bonding straps.

_________________
Pim Pouw

Early Birds Foundation www.vroegevogels.org/
the Netherlands

Fokker G1 replica project www.fokker-g1.nl


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Jun 04, 2009 6:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sat Sep 24, 2005 10:54 am
Posts: 920
Location: Madison, MS
North American AT-6's, SNJ's, and T-6's were not delivered with static wicks. They were constructed using bonding straps. You are confusing the two in the conversation and the context.

Yes, bonding straps on the rudder provide a ground for the tail nav light, if one were installed. Not all T-6's had tail nav lights on the rudders, some had them on the verticle stabilizers. In that case, a bonding strap on the rudder serves the same purpose that a mammary gland serves on a male swine.

_________________
If God had wanted man to fly behind a flat motor, Pratt Whitney would've built one.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 19 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1, 2

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group