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When Hollywood Ruled The Skies - Volumes 1 through 4 by Bruce Oriss


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PostPosted: Tue May 22, 2018 5:35 am 
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There is a nice Ford BNO-40 for sale on Barnstormers. Not mine, no affiliation, just thought it was really cool.

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PostPosted: Thu May 24, 2018 1:10 am 
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Great, went to look at that & stumbled across a Huey that was with a friends unit in Vietnam for 2 years.. so one minute I'm thinking about $10k & suddenly I need $425k.. lol.

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PostPosted: Sun May 27, 2018 5:12 pm 
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A vintage car dealer in Maine has this 1952 Minneapolis-Moline U. S. Air Force tractor for sale; wonder why the USAF needed a wood splitter? :?

Image

http://www.goldenrod-garage.com/DETAIL. ... &MI=1&DH=0

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PostPosted: Tue May 29, 2018 6:35 pm 
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4RG.I.'S wrote:
There is a nice Ford BNO-40 for sale on Barnstormers. Not mine, no affiliation, just thought it was really cool.

For the curious:
RARE WWII TOW TRACTOR • $10,000 • SOLD!! THANKS TO BARNSTORMERS • I have for sale a very rare Ford BNO-40 aircraft tug . approx 3000 total built by ford most went to the US Navy for carrier or island work, we can find fewer than 30 remaining today. this unit is mechanically superb having been mechanically restored by a previous owner. Body work is beautiful and needs little to be ready for a new coat of navy grey paint. my needs have changed and this machine deserves a place on display with a navy airplane owner. • Contact Tim Mccarter, Owner - located Kenosha, WI USA • Telephone: 262-960-3129 • Posted May 18, 2018

Image
Image
Image
(Source: Barnstormers)

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PostPosted: Mon Jul 02, 2018 10:00 pm 
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The Woolaroc Museum & Wildlife Preserve, while not a strict aviation museum, has what appears to be a fuel tanker below its Travel Air 5000. The museum started out as a hangar to display the airplane, the Woolaroc, which won the 1927 Dole Air Race:
Image
(Source: Wikipedia)

While not a museum as such, Air Leasing Limited is of course an important player on the warbird scene in England. Therefore, it seems reasonable to include them here. They have a tractor that, given it's label "ML 407", seems to be of military origin:
Image
(Source: Air Leasing Ltd)

The Museum of Mountain Flying has a 1947 Federal 2 1/2 ton flatbed truck. The title text on the picture describes it as thus:
Museum of Mountain Flying wrote:
This 1947 21/2 ton Federal flat bed truck was used by Johnson Flying Service for years at Missoula’s airport. It was totally restored by museum members and donations from auto businesses. It has been used in local parades for years. A partial 1946 Aeronca Champ is on the back.

Image
(Source: Museum of Mountain Flying)

I have previously included a picture of a truck at the Alaska Aviation Museum, but while browsing an archived copy of an older version of their website I found a few more details about it. To paraphrase the page, it is a 1942 Dodge 1 1/2 ton truck from Hitchinbrook Island, Prince William Sound with 11,000 actual miles, original tires, a flathead 6 engine, a 4 speed, double clutch, is 98% original, has had only four owners and was donated by Jim Dault.
Image
(Source: Alaska Aviation Museum)

The current version of the AAM's website also includes a 1914 Ford Model T known as the "Tillie Reeve Car". According to the museum's page on the car:
Alaska Aviation Museum wrote:
Not an airplane, but this vehicle was affiliated with airplanes from its beginning. Arriving in Alaska in 1915 “before roads,” this truck shuttled mail and passengers between the McCarthy, Alaska train depot and the Kennecott Mine Hotel for 23 years, until the mine closed in 1938. It sat in the ghost town of Kennecott for another 17 years, until the entire town came under the ownership of Cordova Airlines owner Merle “Mudhole” Smith in 1955. It sat as a sign for Smith until bought by Tillie Reeve, wife of Reeve Aleutian Airlines founder and aviation pioneer Bob Reeve. She used it for more than a decade, running errands around Anchorage.

Link to Oversize Photo
(Source: Alaska Aviation Museum)

While perusing the Yankee Air Museum's exhaustive collection of photos on Fotki (it's really great, check it out) I came across another picture of one of their tugs in its former red, white, and blue scheme:
Image
(Source: Fotki)

As seen in the background of the photograph below, the Liberty Aviation Museum has a white aircraft tug that appears to be a Clarktor:
Image
(Source: Flickr)

Finally, to end on an unusual note, the Honduran Aviation Museum has an example of the, "El Compadre", the only car ever built in Honduras. While, as far as I know, it is not technically GSE, it is at an aviation museum and was too unique to not give an honorary mention:
Image
(Source: HistoHonduras)

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PostPosted: Tue Jul 03, 2018 12:31 am 
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ML 407 is the serial # of the Spitfire.

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 05, 2018 9:59 pm 
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ZRX61 wrote:
ML 407 is the serial # of the Spitfire.

I can't believe I didn't realize that. Thanks for pointing that out.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 06, 2018 12:50 pm 
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Looking at a flickr photo of a list of artifacts being restored at Udvar-Hazy (see https://www.flickr.com/photos/kurtsj00/43175844812/in/photolist-28Miurs-LG4eRC-28MRHzg-262S8zE-28FRCGh-28FRxVJ-K7gzRp-28KtLQR-28HZsG8-27CtrdN-27BNBGG-LzuHTw-25WbvAU-28GfQ3g-28GfMiZ-28GfK4D-27j7YXk-27j7YBv-27j7YwR-27j7Yoe-K1rQFR-LwvrpL-25UiRkb-LuUePN-25SFMHu-JWyzFa-28AsM1g-28w2KU3-25PLJdw-27c3VHK-28uoT93-279SgB6-25LzzzE-28sa9nQ-28uvtfr-276HSTe-28p28gA-28oZ4YY-28tmKoc-276FG5K-28tmzd2-25G6cnd-28r17Fg-27xcpt7-27xcvQA-25G6fuA-LgDjso-LgDj9h-28pyCV2-LgDiPj) there is (top of list) a "Mark 9 recovery vehicle" for the Air-Sea Gallery (203).

Can anybody provide a photo or information on this artifact?


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 8:43 pm 
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old iron wrote:
Can anybody provide a photo or information on this artifact?

The board reads "Mark 4 Reentry Vehicle", not "Mark 9 Recovery Vehicle". The object number (A19660029000) matches the Missile, Reentry Vehicle, Mark 4 in the museum's collection. You did make me think of the Mobile Quarantine Facility though.

The Museum of Aeronautical Sciences in Narita, Japan has at least 3 aircraft tugs:

The first appears to be a Clarktor:
Image
(Source: TripAdvisor)

It apparently used to have a wooden seat:
Image
(Source: JetPhotos)

The second is an unknown large, modern tug:
Image
(Source: TripAdvisor)

Image
(Source: TripAdvisor)

The third is an unknown large, modern Schopf tug marked as "HTS" and "TUG-002":
Image
(Source: TripAdvisor)

Image
(Source: Yahoo)

The Museum of Flight has a 1942 Kenworth Firetruck that served at Boeing Field in their Restoration Center and Reserve Collection:
Image
(Source: Flickr)

Image
(Source: Sno-King School Retirees)

They also have a fuel truck marked as used by "Signal Gasoline":
Image
(Source: Sno-King School Retirees)

Finally, the museum has a Consolidated NC-5 tug marked as used by VA-212:
Image
(Source: Flickr)

The Spitfire Museum in Florennes, Belgium has a Clarktor looking tug:
Image
(Source: Sierra Bravo Aeropictures)

They also have something unique - a van that was used by 2nd Squadron left over after the unit disbanded and may have been used for crew transport:
Image
(Source: Sierra Bravo Aeropictures)

Some old pictures from GossHawk Unlimited show a yellow Clarktor tug:
Image
(Source: GossHawk Unlimited)

They also have a different tug, that while unknown, does appear to be of the same type as the one with Stallion 51:
Image
(Source: GossHawk Unlimited)

I also found still more pictures of the Yankee Air Museum's tugs before they were repainted:
Image
(Source: Fotki)

Image
(Source: Fotki)

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PostPosted: Sun Jul 15, 2018 9:06 pm 
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While searching for more pictures of the Museum of Flight firetruck, I came across a a firetruck on display at the Riga Aviation Museum. In the process, I found a page with pictures of a bunch of GSE at the museum. However, due to the number of pictures, I decided to make it a separate post. I do want to point out that while some of these are obviously GSE, it is not clear whether all of them are - although it seems reasonable to presume given their company. Unfortunately, many of them are in dire need of restoration as the museum seems to be little more than a junkyard.

GSE at the Riga Aviation Museum
  • AA-60 (MAZ-7310) Fire Truck - Marked as "102"
    Image
  • MAZ-403 Fuel Tanker - Marked as "489"
    Image
  • GAZ-66 Command Vehicle - Marked as "Concors Latvia Air Service" and "AR-4620"
    Image
  • GAZ-42 - Used by Riga Airport and "258"
    Image
  • ZIL-140
    Image
  • ZIL-157 Radar Truck
    Image
  • ZAZ-965
    Image
(Source: Comtourist)

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 04, 2018 12:10 am 
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I already posted about a tug at C. R. Smith Museum near the beginning of this thread (you can see it in the background of the first picture below), but apparently I missed the fact that they have a second one:

Image
(Source: Google Plus)

Image
(Source: Google Plus)

I went on an Australian kick today and dug up a few examples down under.

The Australian Aviation Heritage Center has a number of pieces of GSE, including a bomb loader...
Image
(Source: Google Plus)

...a large Qantas tug...
Image
(Source: Google Plus)

...a yellow Clarktor tug...
Image
(Source: Google Plus)

...and the slickest looking airport stair truck I have ever seen.
Image
(Source: LetsGoKids)

Image
(Source: Expedia)

The Central Australian Aviation Museum has the same type of stair truck as the AAHC:
Image
(Source: Google Plus)

On the Canadian front, the British Columbia Aviation Museum has a sky blue tug:
Image
(Source: British Columbia Aviation Museum)

The Canada Aviation and Space Museum appears to have used a yellow tug with an enclosed cab at some point:
Image
(Source: Ingenium)

The Museum of Aviation at Warner Robins apparently uses a Wollard MB-4 to move their aircraft:
Image
(Source: Robins Air Force Base)

Image
(Source: The Telegraph)

They also have a bunch of GSE on display inside the museum. These include what appears to be a different Wollard MB-4, a bomb loader...
Image
(Source: Museum of Aviation)

...an unknown yellow truck, a yellow Clarktor, and an unknown yellow wheeled piece of equipment.
Image
(Source: Flickr)

The MoA likely has a bunch more as well, but I don't have the time right now to look for them (or better pictures of the above), so I'll have to save it for a future post.

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 13, 2018 10:47 pm 
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I was recently perusing Indiana and Illinois aviation museums and I came across a few examples of GSE.

The Prairie Aviation Museum has what appears to be 2 tugs and a yellow starter cart that are visible next to a structure to the right of the Cessna 310 on Google Maps satellite view, but I can't seem to find any pictures of them on the ground.

I found two pictures (1, 2) of tug(s) being used to tow the museum's A-7 around the time it arrived, but they don't appear to be the tug mentioned above. It may not even be the same tug in both pictures.

The Heritage in Flight Museum has a number of ground vehicles - including some GSE:

Apparently those O-11's are everywhere:
Image
(Source: Flickr)

In addition, there is a red painted pickup truck marked as "74L 217" that may have been used as a crash truck for the Air Force:
Image
(Source: Google Plus?)

They also have a blue jeep-looking vehicle and a yellow tug inside:
Link to Oversize Picture
(Source: Blogspot

Finally, I don't know if it technically counts, but they have a WWII searchlight that you can rent:
Image
(Source: Heritage in Flight Museum)

The Air Combat Museum has quite a few tugs apparently (assuming they all belong to the museum and are not just visiting):

There is what appears to be a Clark CK series tug behind the Extra 300. Given its camouflage paint scheme it is doing a pretty good job of hiding:
Image
(Source: Google Plus)

At first, due to their similarity, I thought this was the same tug I had included in an earlier post.
Image
(Source: Flickr)

Image
(Source: Flickr)

The tug is in front of the T-34 on the left. Note that this must be a different tug than the one in the previous image as the roof is not red:
Image
(Source: Flickr)

The Lauridsen Aviation Museum has a what appears to be a Clarktor tug. Note also the rear of what is likely a fire truck on the extreme right of the picture:
Image
(Source: B-25 History Project)

The Ulster Aviation Society has 3 pieces of GSE according to their website:

On the subject of Thorneycroft Amazon Cranes, while not strictly an aviation museum, the Imperial War Museum also has one. The Yorkshire Air Museum, as noted in a previous post, has Thorneycroft Amazon Crane as well.

The Reynolds-Alberta Museum has what appears to be a yellow painted Clarktor:
Link to Oversize Picture
(Source: Facebook)

The Museum of Flight and Aerial Firefighting uses an unknown gray tug:
Link to Oversize Picture
(Source: Facebook)

The NMUSAF had to pull out one of their big boys for their B-36:
Link to Oversize Picture
(Source: National Museum of the US Air Force)

While an aircraft restoration company and not an aviation museum, Fighting Classics Aircraft Restoration has a number of pieces of GSE:
Image
(Source: Aircraft Tin Feathers Photographs)

Image
(Source: Aircraft Tin Feathers Photographs)

Image
(Source: Aircraft Tin Feathers Photographs)

Finally, the Flying Leatherneck Aviation Museum has a 1944 International Harvester FFN-3 fire and crash crew engine that was used at Marine Corps Air Station El Toro in 1944:
Image
(Source: Marines.mil)

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 17, 2018 11:07 pm 
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Here we are again with more ground support vehicles!

While not technically at museum, the Aircraft Restoration Company uses some sort of small olive drab aircraft tug:
Image
(Source: Warbird Digest)

An unknown yellow tug labeled "23" and "K" at the Pima Air & Space Museum. Although the museum was covered in a previous post, this tug was not included:
Image
(Source: Flickr)

An unknown Qantas tug at the Queensland Air Museum. Note the small vehicle behind the helicopter:
Image
(Source: ADF-Serials)

An what appears to be a fire truck at the RAN Fleet Air Arm Museum. Note that this is the exact same helicopter in the above picture:
Image
(Source: ADF-Serials)

Similar in type to the one at the Freeman Army Airfield Museum mentioned in an earlier post, the Mighty Eighth Air Force Museum apparently has a 1941 Ford fire truck that served at Hunter Field during World War II. It is technically on loan to the museum from the Fort Stewart Museum. A couple of news articles (1, 2, 3) were written about the truck when it was placed on loan:
Image
(Source: The American Automobile Industry in World War Two)

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 24, 2018 12:44 am 
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A few quick ones, mostly foreign:

The Indian Air Force Museum has this apparent aircraft tug on display:
Image
(Source: Google Plus)

The Cnel. (Av.) Jaime Meregalli Aeronautical Museum has a Thompson Brothers P505 Mk V painted in Shell colors on display:
Image
(Source: Google Plus)

Image
(Source: Google Plus)

I have already posted GSE from the Royal Air Force Museum thrice before (1, 2, 3), but, perhaps unsurprisingly, there's still more there to be found. They also have a Thompson Brothers TB P505:
Image
(Source: Flickr)

The Ashburton Aviation Museum has a Thompson Brothers refueller as well, circa 1948, plate number DV 4902. Apparently, they acquired it around 2013:
Image
(Source: Flickr)

The Al Mahatta Museum has a Thompson Bros TB P505 Mk V in BP colors on display. It had been used at the airport since the 1940s:
Image
(Source: 360CarMuseum.com)

While not an aviation museum, the Association de Sauvegarde du Patrimoine Historique Militaire has a TB P505 Mk V, painted in RAF colors, and number 670108:
Image
(Source: ASPHM)

I will also note that, as previously mentioned, the Brooklands Museum has a Thompson "Mobile Refuelling Tender" as well.

Finally, I found a picture of one last example of the type. Unfortunately, I can't find any information about where it is, but based on the background it appears to be an aircraft hangar - likely an aviation museum:
Image
(Source: CSDY Daily Cars)

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 25, 2018 9:24 pm 
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Noha307 wrote:
Here we are again with more ground support vehicles!

While not technically at museum, the Aircraft Restoration Company uses some sort of small olive drab aircraft tug:
Image
(Source: Warbird Digest)


They've had that tug at Dx for at least 30 years that I know of. It's called Terrence :)

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